Aren’t you tired of being mean?

IMG_5860August 27, 2017, marked an action of sacred change among the congregation of the First Baptist Church of Christ in Macon, Georgia. I was proud of the church I have recently become a part of, not only because of our adoption of a policy that ensures the full acceptance of LGBTQ parsons, but also because of the thoughtful and intentional process that resulted in the decision for inclusion, acceptance, unity, justice and love.

The church leadership spent a great deal of time and energy in a discerning process that led to this recommendation:

“The Church Council and Board of Deacons of the First Baptist Church of Christ support the full inclusion in the life of the church of all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. In light of this statement, the Church Council and Board of Deacons recommend thar full inclusion encompasses same-sex marriage in our church facilities.”

The leadership then planned a series of congregational meetings so that every member felt respected and heard. I was present at two of three community meetings that included review of Scripture, open dialogue, listening to one another, respecting diverse views, eating together, singing and praying. Following those meetings, the motion was brought to the church in business conference. The motion passed with 73% of the congregation voting to approve. An amazing phenomenon for a Georgia Baptist church!

I could not help but think that this result was much more than a single vote. It was inclusion and acceptance. It was a proclamation of justice and unity among people of faith. It was a community of God’s people seeking to live out Christ’s commandment to love one another.

This week I read about the creation of a newly penned doctrinal statement in which a coalition of conservative evangelical leaders laid out their beliefs on human sexuality, including opposition to same-sex marriage andย fluid gender identity.

The signers of the Nashville Statement say that it is theirย response to an โ€œincreasingly post-Christian, Western culture that thinks it can change God’s design for humans.โ€ย Since it wasย released Tuesday morning, the Nashville Statement has received praise for its clarity. It has also been denouncedย as very hurtful and harmful to LGBTQ people.

I read the Preamble and pondered each of the fourteen Articles of the statement. With sadness, I looked through the list of hundreds of signers, finding the names of leaders from all of our original Southern Baptist seminaries. I remembered the loss of our seminaries and the painful times that our beloved seminary professors endured. Most of all, I cringed at the statementโ€™s language. I thought about my many LGBTQ friends and recalled their Christian faith. And I was very troubled, frightened by the many ways that hate can flourish in our world.

I then read an article in response to the Nashville Statement by my long time friend, Nancy Hastings Sehested, published in the latest edition of prayer and politiks.org. I can come up with no words that are as fully Christian as Nancyโ€™s thoughts in this insightful article. I print it here in its entirety.

Tired of Being Mean: A Response to the “Nashville Statement”

It was the last night of Vacation Bible School at the Sweet Fellowship Baptist Church. All week our five year olds rehearsed the story of Pharaoh and Moses to dramatize for their parents. All four boys wanted to be mean โ€˜ole Pharaoh.

With the church pews filled with family, the performance commenced. Our wee Pharaoh sat on his throne holding his plastic sword. Then little Moses walked up to him with his shepherdโ€™s crook and said, โ€œPharaoh, stop hurting my people. Let my people go.โ€

Our Pharaoh wielded his sword in the air and said, โ€œNever, never, never!โ€

Moses walked away and then returned with the same words. โ€œPharaoh, stop hurting my people. Let my people go!โ€

Pharaoh said nothing. I thought heโ€™d forgotten his lines. I scooted toward him and whispered, โ€œSay โ€˜Never, Never, Neverโ€™.โ€

Nothing.

Then our little Pharaoh jumped down from his throne, threw down his sword and said, โ€œIโ€™m tired of being mean. I donโ€™t want to be mean anymore!โ€

Imagine meanness in the world ending due to fatigue.

It seems that we are simply not tired enough. But surely we are close to exhaustion sorting out who needs our meanness now. Just flipping through the Bible to find which people to hate is draining. These days itโ€™s hard to find a Midianite to kill. Stoning incorrigible teenagers to death in the town square could leave few maturing into adulthood. Abominating people who are โ€œsowers of discordโ€ or have โ€œhaughty eyesโ€ could unleash a bloodbath in our churches.

Arenโ€™t we worn out yet from using the Bible as a bully stick for meanness?

The “Nashville Statement” is a clear indication that some religious Pharaohs are not tired of wielding their sword of hatred. But the rest of us are tired of one more abusive word against gay, lesbian and transgendered people in the name of religion. Whoโ€™s next? Women ministers? Oh, wait. Thatโ€™s a mean streak that started decades ago.

Signers of the statement, here is a word to you: Donโ€™t you have something better to do? Feed the hungry? Visit the prisoners? Shelter the homeless from the hurricane? Give the thirsty some clean drinking water? Stop mad men from starting a nuclear war? If you are afraid of the world changing too fast or becoming too complex for you, then say, โ€œIโ€™m afraid.โ€ Then be assured that God is with you in this changing world. But donโ€™t use your own selective Bible verses to hurt beloved people of God. Weโ€™re tired of your meanness. God is too.


– Rev. Nancy Hastings Sehested

Co-Pastor, Circle of Mercy Congregation, Asheville, North Carolina

August 31, 2017

 

My final words for this dayโ€™s blog post are simple:

Amen.

Thank you, Nancy.

May God bless the extravagant love shown by Maconโ€™s First Baptist Church of Christ.

And may we all grow tired of being mean!

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